WHY HAVE GM IGNITION PARTS FORCED A RECALL OF SEVERAL VEHICLE MODELS?

This ignition must be installed just right to ensure safe operation of the vehicle. While the vehicle is in motion, if this part fails, it can mean sudden loss of power, possibly disabling important vehicle systems like the brakes, the air bags, or power steering.

Several of the company’s models have demonstrated these concerns, experiencing unpredictable loss of power and putting drivers in extreme danger. In fact, at least 13 deaths are believed to be responsible for the faulty parts, though this is just the company’s estimate. A separate watchdog group, the Center for Auto Safety, places the number much higher, with at least 300 deaths attributable to the defective vehicles.

The problem can be caused by relatively innocuous stresses, like bumping from rough roads, or something as simple as a heavy key ring. The manufacturer suggests not using key rings that are burdened with other keys or heavy key chains, but even this is not foolproof.

WHICH GM VEHICLES ARE PART OF IGNITION RECALL EFFORTS?

Through March 2014, the alert concerned about 2.5 million vehicles. By June 2014, the company had expanded the alert to about 10 million vehicles. It encompasses a large number of vehicle models, including:

  • 1997-2005 Chevy Malibu
  • 1998-2002 Oldsmobile Intrigue
  • 1999-2004 Oldsmobile Aero
  • 2000-2005 Cadillac Deville
  • 2000-2008 Chevy Monte Carlo
  • 2000-2014 Chevy Impala
  • 2003-2007 Saturn Ion
  • 2004-2005 Buick Regal LS & GS
  • 2004-2008 Chevy Monte Carlo
  • 2004-2011 Cadillac DTS
  • 2005-2009 Buick Lacrosse
  • 2005-2010 Chevy Cobalt
  • 2006-2011 Chevy HHR
  • 2006-2011 Buick Lucerne
  • 2007-2010 Pontiac G5
  • 2007-2010 Saturn Sky


WHY HAS THE GM IGNITION RECALL BEEN MET WITH A LOT OF CRITICISM FOR THE COMPANY?

The manufacturer’s defective ignitions have been known for some time, possibly dating as far back as 2001. In 2001, the company received a report concerning a Saturn Ion that demonstrated the defect, but no action was taken at the time. In 2004, one of the company’s engineers unexpectedly experienced the issue while taking a Chevy Cobalt for a test driver. In 2005, internal company documents show that the manufacturer was aware of the problem and confirmed that it wasn’t confined to a few freak incidents.

Until 2014, the company did not attempt to remove the defective vehicles from the roads, instead pushing the problem onto dealers and forcing them to fix the defect. It’s also believed that the manufacturer was in violation of National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) regulations when it failed to report the problem to the NHTSA right away. This violation carries a $35 million fine.

If you or a loved one has been hurt in a vehicle that is part of the GM ignition recall, you might want to consult with a lawyer to see if you are eligible for compensation. Because sudden vehicle failure can result in severe or fatal injuries, hundreds of lawsuits have already been filed against GM.