• alloimmune hemolytic anemia: a condition where red blood cells are destroyed faster than they can be created, which means the baby will not receive enough oxygen

  • anemia: low concentration of red blood cells or below normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood

  • antibody: a type of protein that detects harmful proteins called antigens

  • antigen: any substance that causes your body to produce antibodies against it

  • apnea: a state of suspended breathing

  • athetoid cerebral palsy: a form of cerebral palsy, which is also known as dyskinetic cerebral palsy, and is marked by slow and involuntary muscle movement

  • avulsion: the most severe type of brachial plexus injury, in which the nerve is torn from the spine

  • bilirubin: a colored substance created when red blood cells break down

  • brachial plexus: the network of nerves that conduct signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand

  • brain stem: posterior portion of the brain, connected with the spinal cord, which regulates motor and sensory functions

  • cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): clear liquid inside and around the brain and spinal cord area

  • cesarean section: a surgical procedure when incisions are made in a woman’s abdomen through which to deliver a baby

  • cyanosis: condition when skin has a bluish tinge

  • defendant: the individual or entity your attorney believes to be responsible for your birth injury

  • dental dysplasia: abnormal development of two or more teeth within one or both jaws

  • dystocia: difficulty during child birth

  • erythroblastosis fetalis: severe hyperbilirubinemia/jaundice

  • euphoria: mental or emotional state associated with bliss or profound well-being

  • fetus: the developing state for mammals after the embryonic stage and before birth

  • heart murmur: inconsistent or turbulent flow of blood that is loud enough to cause a sound

  • hypertonia: when muscles have an increased level of resting activity and an increased resistance to stretch

  • hypotonia: low muscle tone, which often leads to reduced muscle strength

  • induced labor: artificial method of stimulating childbirth in a woman

  • jaundice: discoloration of the skin due to a high concentration of bilirubin in the blood

  • kernicterus: when infants sustain damage to the brain centers due to high concentration of bilirubin

  • lethargy: extreme physical and/or mental fatigue

  • neuroma: a brachial plexus injury in which the nerve has torn and healed but scar tissue puts pressure on the injured nerve and prevents it from conducting signals to the muscles

  • neuropraxia: brachial plexus injury, also known as a “stretch,” in which the nerve has been damaged but not torn

  • oxygen deficiency: during childbirth when the infant suffers an injury that prevents oxygen flow to the brain

  • palsy: paralysis of a body part, which is often associated with lack of sensation and ability to control movement

  • paralysis: inability to use muscles, which can be associated with loss of feeling in muscles

  • placenta: an organ that connects a developing fetus to the uterine wall, which allows for nutrient uptake, waste elimination, and gas exchange via the mother’s blood supply

  • plaintiff: the individual filing a claim for damages

  • rupture: a brachial plexus injury in which the nerve is torn but not at the spinal attachment

  • serosa: a smooth membrane consisting of cells that excrete serous fluid and line and enclose body cavities

  • trauma: a serious or body altering injury

  • uterus: also known as the “womb,” this is the major reproductive sex organ in which the fetus develops during pregnancy